Bring Contrast Into Your Garden Design

Anyone can learn how to maintain an organic garden and enjoy it. If you are unfamiliar with gardening in general, or the specifics of organic gardening, the process may be daunting. How should a novice approach the learning experience of growing plants? Read this article, and follow the helpful advice.

If you start to notice some powdery mildew growing on your plants, there is no need to waste money on expensive chemicals. All it takes is a liquid soap, water, and baking soda mixture. Once every week, you should spray the mixture on your plants; the mildew will disappear shortly thereafter. Your plants will not be harmed by the baking soda, but the mildew will definitely not like it!

Design your garden so that your harvest is staggered over as long a season as possible. Use cold-tolerant root crops and greens in the fall, for example, and plan to pick and preserve early strawberries in June. This way, you will have the space and time in your life to store everything you grow.

Salt deposits can form unsightly marks on your clay pots. To easily remove the deposits mix water, rubbing alcohol and white vinegar in equal parts and spray onto the pots. Scrub with a plastic pad or brush and allow the pot to dry completely. Once the pot is dry, you are ready to plant.

Plant perennials that slugs and snails won't be interested in eating. Slugs and snails can decimate a plant in one night. Snails and slugs like to eat perennials with smooth and thin leaves, especially if they are young plants. Some perennials are not preferred meals for snails and slugs, especially if their foliage is hairy and tough, or tastes bad. Some of these plants include achillea, campanula, euphorbia, hellaborus, and heuchera.

Get your kids and grand kids involved with gardening by letting them help you in the garden, and by taking them to nurseries and arboretums. Children generally love being outdoors and will soak up any knowledge you are willing to share about sunlight, water, and soil quality. Gardening is a great way for children to learn about nature and for them to bond with you.

Create living walls in your garden. A living wall can take many forms: it can be as tall or low as you want, informal or formal, a single plant or created out of multiple plants. A wall of forsythia, lilac or roses offers eye-level blossoms and fragrance. Some people like the look of a formal, clipped hedge of privet or boxwood. Many flowering shrubs can be adapted to form a hedge, such as hebe, abelia or diosma. For existing structures, such as a fence or trellis, a vine such as clematis or morning glory can cover it in a season, offering a vivid display of vertical color.

One way to slowly-water your plant is by using a plastic bottle, such as a 2-liter soda bottle. Punch a few small holes in the bottom of the bottle, fill it to the neck with water and replace the cap. Place it in the soil and use the cap to regulate the flow of water.

In areas that are very dry, you should plant drought resistant plants. These hardy plants will survive, and thrive, on very little water, and in hot conditions. Many varieties have blooms as beautiful as any high maintenance types of plants. You can even get low-water edible plants for your garden.

Plant ornamental, edible plants as part of your regular yard landscaping. Good plants to start with include rosemary, thyme varieties, sages, oregano and basil. These all look great mixed with perennials, and they will supply you with enough that you won't need to purchase them anymore - herbs are expensive at the supermarket.

Planting a living hedge around your property has many benefits. Hedges provide a softer barrier to mark the perimeter of your property and are less forbidding than a structured wall. A living hedge will provide privacy but still discourage trespassing by animals or people. If you have a hedge that blooms, it can be a lovely backdrop in addition to your landscape.

Use compost to feed your crops. In organic gardening, compost is necessary for the survival of your plants. A home compost pile is a great, inexpensive source of compost. Many food scraps, grass, and dry leaves can be used in your compost. However, avoid cooked foods, ash, and animal waste in an organic compost pile.

Use approximately two or three inches of natural, organic material as some mulch in every single flower bed. This will discourage weeds from growing, add nutrients, and retain the moisture in your garden. In addition, your flower beds will have a beautiful, finished appearance year round.

Use companion plants. Companion planting is the pairing of plants within your vegetable garden, such as planting cabbage with tomatoes. Companion planting helps reduce the problems with insect pests, as it attracts natural pest-controlling wildlife. Companion planting is also a better use of the space in your garden, since you basically have two plants in the same plot.

A good garden says a great deal about its gardeners. The best gardeners are innovators, always on the lookout for new ideas and handy tips. A garden tended well, which features a rotation of novel plantings and features, conveys to every observer the diligence, sensitivity and imagination of the gardener who maintains it.
Nursery Campbellfield

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